When Is the Best Time to Treat Heart Attack Patients With Stem Cells?


Several preclinical trials in laboratory animals and clinical trials have definitively demonstrated the efficacy of stem cell treatments after a heart attack. However, these same studies have left several question largely unresolved. For example, when is the best time to treat acute heart attack patients? What is the appropriate stem cell dose? What is the best way to administer these stem cells? Is it better to use a patient’s own stem cells or stem cells from someone else?

A recent clinical trial from Soochow University in Suzhou, China has addressed the question of when to treat heart attack patients. Published in the Life Sciences section of the journal Science China, Yi Huan Chen and Xiao Mei Teng and their colleagues in the laboratory of Zen Ya Shen administered bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells at different times after a heart attack. Their study also examined the effects of mesenchymal stem cells transplants at different times after a heart attack in Taihu Meishan pigs. This combination of preclinical and clinical studies makes this paper a very powerful piece of research indeed.

The results of the clinical trial came from 42 heart attack patients who were treated 3 hours after suffering a heart attack, or 1 day, 3 days, 2 weeks or 4 weeks after a heart attack. The patients were evaluated with echocardiogram to ascertain heart function and magnetic resonance imaging of the heart to determine the size of the heart scar, the thickness of the heart wall, and the amount of blood pumped per heart beat (stroke volume).

When the data were complied and analyzed, patients who received their stem cell transplants 2-4 weeks after their heart attacks fared better than the other groups. The heart function improved substantially and the size of the infarct shrank the most. 4 weeks was better than 2 weeks,

The animal studies showed very similar results.

Eight patients were selected to receive additional stem cell transplants. These patients showed even greater improvements in heart function (ejection fraction improved to an average of 51.9% s opposed to 39.3% for the controls).

These results show that 2-4 weeks constitutes the optimal window for stem cell transplantation. If the transplant is given too early, then the environment of he heart is simply too hostile to support the survival of the stem cells. However, if the transplant is performed too late, the heart has already experiences a large amount of cell death, and a stem cell treatment might be superfluous. Instead 2-4 weeks appears to be the “sweet spot” when the heart is hospitable enough to support the survival of the transplanted stem cells and benefit from their healing properties. Also, this paper shows that multiple stem cell transplants a two different times to convey additional benefits, and should be considered under certain conditions.

Treating Age-Related Blindness with a Stem Cell Replacement Method


A collaboration between German and American scientists in New York City has resulted in the invention of a new method for transplanting stem cells into the eyes of patients who suffer from age-related macular degeneration, which is the most frequent cause of blindness. In an animal test, the implanted stem cells survived in the eyes of rabbits for several weeks.

Approximately 4.5 millino people in Germany suffer from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which causes gradual loss of visual acuity and affects the ability to read, drive a car or do fine work. The center of the vision field becomes blurry as though covered by a veil. This vision loss is a consequence of the death of cells in the retinal pigment epithelium or RPE, which lies are the back of the eye, underneath the neural retina.

Inflammation within the RPE causes AMD. Increased inflammation prevents efficient recycling of metabolic waste products, and the build-up of toxic wastes causes RPE die off. Without the RPE, the photoreceptors in front of the RPE cells that also depend on the RPE to repair the damage suffered from continuous light exposure, begin to die off too.

RPE

Retinal Pigmented Epithelium

Presently no cure exists for AMD, but scientists at Bonn University, in the Department of Ophthalmology and New York City have tested a new procedure that replaces damaged RPE cells.

In the present experiment, RPE cells made from human stem cells were successfully implanted into the retinas of rabbits.

Boris V. Stanzel, the lead author of this work, said, “These cells have now been used for the first time in research for transplantation purposes.”

The adult RPE stem cells were characterized by Timothy Blenkinsop and his colleagues at the Neural Stem Cell Institute in New York City. Blenkinsop designed methods to isolate and grow these cells. He also flew to Germany to assist Dr. Stanzel with the transplantation experiments.  Blenkinsop obtained his RPE cells from human cadavers, and he grew them on polyester matrices.

These experiments demonstrate that RPE cells obtained from adult stem cells can replace cells destroyed by AMD. This newly developed transplantation method makes it possible to test which stem cells lines are most suitable for transplantation into the eye.