Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Combined with Growth Factors Improves Traumatic Brain Injury Outcomes


Approximately 2 million Americans experience a traumatic brain injury every year. Most of these are individuals who employed in high-risk jobs such as the military, firefighting, police work and others types of essential but highly dangerous jobs. No matter how small the injury, individuals who have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) can suffer from a whole host of motor, behavioral, intellectual and cognitive disabilities over the short or long-term. Unfortunately, there are few clinical treatments for TBI, and the few we have are rather ineffective.

In order to design better, more effective treatments for TBI, neuroscientists at the Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, Department of Neurosurgery in the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, have used umbilical cord stem cells in combination with growth factors to treat TBIs in mice.

This study investigated the ability of several strategies, both by themselves and in combination with other therapies, to treat rats with a laboratory form of TBI. In particular, the USF team discovered that a combination of human umbilical cord blood cells (hUBCs) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a growth factor, was more therapeutic than either administered alone, or each with saline, or saline alone.

“Chronic TBI is typically associated with major secondary molecular injuries, including chronic neuroinflammation, which not only contribute to the death of neuronal cells in the central nervous system, but also impede any natural repair mechanism,” said study lead author Cesar V. Borlongan, PhD, professor of neurosurgery and director of USF’s Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair. “In our study, we used hUBCs and G-CSF alone and in combination. In previous studies, hUBCs have been shown to suppress inflammation, and G-CSF is currently being investigated as a potential therapeutic agent for patients with stroke or Alzheimer’s disease.”

In previous studies, Borlongan and his team showed that G-CSF can mobilize stem cells from bone marrow and induce them to home to and infiltrate injured tissues. While there, the cells promote neural cell self-repair. Cells from human umbilical cord blood also have the ability to suppress inflammation and promote cell growth.

“Our results showed that the combined therapy of hUBCs and G-CSF significantly reduced the TBI-induced loss of neuronal cells in the hippocampus,” said Borlongan. “Therapy with hUBCs and G-CSF alone or in combination produced beneficial results in animals with experimental TBI. G-CSF alone produced only short-lived benefits, while hUBCs alone afforded more robust and stable improvements. However, their combination offered the best motor improvement in the laboratory animals.”

“This outcome may indicate that the stem cells had more widespread biological action than the drug therapy,” said Paul R. Sanberg, distinguished professor at USF and principal investigator of the Department of Defense funded project. “Regardless, their combination had an apparent synergistic effect and resulted in the most effective amelioration of TBI-induced behavioral deficits.”

This particular study examined motor improvements or improvements in movement, but the USF group suggested that future combination therapy research should also include analysis of cognitive improvement in the laboratory animals with TBI.

In short, umbilical cord cell and growth factor treatments tested in animal models could offer hope for millions, including U.S. war veterans with traumatic brain injuries.

Post-script:  On Twitter, Alexey Bersenev made some very helpful observations about this paper.  In this paper, the authors used whole human umbilical cord blood.  They did not attempt to separate any of the different cell types from the cord blood.  Now when such whole blood is used, it is easy to assume that the stem cells in the blood that are doing the regenerative work.  However, as Alexey graciously pointed out, you cannot assume that the stem cells are responsible for the therapeutic effects for at least two main reasons:  1)  the number of stem cells in the cord blood is quite small relative to the other cells; 2) some of the non-stem cells in the blood turn out to have therapeutic effects.  See here and here.  I have seen some of these papers before, but I did not think much of them.  Therefore, until the cell populations in the umbilical cord blood are dissected out and studied, all we can say with any confidence is SOMETHING in the cord blood is conveying a therapeutic effect, but the identity of the therapeutic culprit remains unclear at this time.

Stem Cells from Muscle Can Repair Nerve Damage After Injury


Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have discovered that stem cells derived from human muscle tissue can repair nerve damage and restore function in an animal model of sciatic nerve injury. These data have been recently published online in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, but more importantly, this work demonstrates the feasibility of cell therapy for certain nerve diseases, such as multiple sclerosis.

Presently there are few treatments for peripheral nerve damage. Peripheral nerve damage can leave patients with chronic pain, impaired muscle control and decreased sensation.

The senior author of this work, Henry J. Mankin, serves as the Chair in Orthopedic Surgery Research, Pitt School of Medicine, and deputy director for cellular therapy, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and said, “This study indicates that placing adult, human muscle-derived stem cells at the site of peripheral nerve injury can help heal the lesion. The stem cells were able to make non-neuronal support cells to promote regeneration of the damaged nerve fiber.”

Muscle-derived stem cells

Workers in Mankin’s laboratory, in collaboration with Dr. Mitra Lavasani, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery, Pitt School of Medicine, grew human muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells in culture by using a culture medium suitable for nerve cells. In culture, Lavasani, Mankin and their colleagues found that when these muscle-derived stem cells were grown in the presence of specific nerve-growth factors, they differentiated into neurons and glial cells. Glial cells act as support cells from neurons. One type of glial cell that these muscle-derived stem cells could differentiate into was Schwann cells, which are the cells that form the myelin sheath around the axons of neurons to accelerate the speed at which nerve impulses are conducted.

Schwann Cell

Mankin and his colleagues then injected these human muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells into mice that had a quarter-inch injury in their right sciatic nerve. The sciatic nerve controls right leg movement. Six weeks later, the nerve had fully regenerated in stem-cell treated mice, but the untreated group showed only limited nerve regrowth and functionality. In other tests, 12 weeks after treatments, the stem cell-treated mice were able to keep their treated and untreated legs balanced at the same level while being held vertically by their tails. When the treated mice ran through a special maze, analyses of their paw prints showed that their gait, which had been abnormal, was now completely normal. Finally, treated and untreated mice experienced loss of muscle mass after nerve damage, but only the stem cell-treated mice regained normal muscle mass by 72 weeks after nerve damage.

sciatic-nerve

“Even 12 weeks after the injury, the regenerated sciatic nerve looked and behaved like a normal nerve,” Dr. Lavasani said. “This approach has great potential for not only acute nerve injury, but also conditions of chronic damage, such as diabetic neuropathy and multiple sclerosis.”

Drs. Huard and Lavasani and the team are now trying to understand how the human muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells triggered injury repair. They are also developing delivery systems, such as gels, that could hold the cells in place at larger injury sites.

The co-authors of this paper included Seth D. Thompson, Jonathan B. Pollett, Arvydas Usas, Aiping Lu, Donna B. Stolz, Katherine A. Clark, Bin Sun, and Bruno Péault, all of whom are from the University of Pittsburgh.

Human STAP cells – Troubling Possibilities


Soon after the publication of this paper that adult mouse cells could be reprogrammed into embryonic-like stem cells simply by exposing them to acidic environments or other stresses , Charles Vacanti at Harvard Medical School has reported that he and his colleagues have demonstrated that this procedure works with human cells.

STAP cells or stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency cells were derived by Vacanti and his Japanese collaborators last year. These new findings show that adult cells can be reprogrammed into embryonic-like stem cells without genetic engineering. However, this technique worked well in mouse cells, but it was not clear that it would work with human adult cells.

Vacanti and others shocked the world when they published their paper in the journal Nature earlier this year when they announced that adult cells in mice could be reprogrammed through exposure to stresses and proper culture conditions.

Now Vacanti has made good on his promise to test his protocol on human adult cells. In the photo below, provided by Vacanti, human adult cells were reprogrammed to a pluripotent state by exposing them to stresses, followed by growth in culture under specific conditions.

Human STAP cells
Human STAP cells

“If they can do this in human cells, it changes everything, said Robert Lanza of Advanced Cell Technologies in Marlborough, Massachusetts. Such a procedure promises cheaper, faster, and potentially more flexible cells for regenerative medicine, cancer therapy and cell and tissue cloning.

Vacanti and his colleagues say they have taken human fibroblast cells and tested several environmental stressors on them to recreate human STAP cells. He will not presently disclose which particular stressors were applied, he says the resulting cells appear similar in form to the mouse STAP cells. His team is in the process of testing to see just how stem-cell-like these cells are.

According to Vacanti, the human cells took about a week to resemble STAP cells, and formed spherical clusters just like their mouse counterparts. Vacanti and his Harvard colleague Koji Kojima emphasized that these results are only preliminary and further analysis and validation is required.

Bioethical problems potentially emerge with STAP cells despite their obvious potential. The mouse cells that were derived and characterized by Vacanti’s group and his collaborators were capable of making placenta as well as adult cell types. This is different from embryonic stem cells, which can potentially form all adult cell types, but typically do not form placenta. Embryonic stem cells, therefore, are pluripotent, which means that they can form all adult cell types. However, the mouse STAP cells can form all embryonic and adult cell types and are, therefore, totipotent. Mouse STAP cells could form an entirely new mouse. While it is now clear if human STAP cells, if they in fact exist, have this capability, but if they do, they could potentially lead to human cloning.

Sally Cowley, who heads the James Martin Stem Cell Facility at the University of Oxford, said of Vacanti’s present experiments: “Even if these are STAP cells they may not necessarily have the same potential as mouse ones – they may not have the totipotency – which is one of the most interesting features of the mouse cells.”

However the only cells known to be naturally totipotent are in embryos that have only undergone the first couple of cell divisions immediately after fertilization. According to Cowley, any research that utilizes totipotent cells would have to be under very strict regulatory surveillance. “It would actually be ideal if the human cells could be pluripotent and not totipotent – it would make everyone’s life a lot easier,” she opined.

Cowley continued: “However, the whole idea that adult cells are so plastic is incredibly fascinating,” she says. “Using stem cells has been technically incredibly challenging up to now and if this is feasible in human cells it would make working with them cheaper, faster and technically a lot more feasible.”

This is all true, but Robert Lanza from Advanced Cell Technology in Marlborough, Massachusetts, a scientist with whom I have often deeply disagreed, noted: “The word totipotent brings up all kinds of issues,” says Robert Lanza of Advanced Cell Technology in Marlborough, Massachusetts. “If these cells are truly totipotent, and they are reproducible in humans then they can implant in a uterus and have the potential to be turned into a human being. At that point you’re entering into a right-to-life quagmire”

A quagmire indeed, for Vacanti has already talked about using these STAP cells to clone human embryos. Think of it: the creation of very young human beings just for the purpose of ripping them apart and using their cells for research or medicine. Would we allow this if the embryo were older; say the age of a toddler? No we would rightly condemn it as murder, but because the embryo is very young, that somehow counts against it. This is little more than morally grading the embryo according to astrology.

Therefore, whole Vacanti’s experiments are exciting and novel, they hold chilling possibilities. Lanza is right, and it is doubtful that scientists would show the same deference or sensitivities to the moral exigencies he has shown.

Stem Cell-based Baldness Cure One Step Closer


Scientists might be able to offer people with less that optimal amounts of hair new hope when it comes to reversing baldness. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania say they’ve moved closer to using stem cells to treat thinning hair — at least in mice.

This group said that the use of stem cells to regenerate missing or dying hair follicles is considered a potential way to reverse hair loss. However, the technology did not exist to generate adequate numbers of hair-follicle-generating stem cells.

But new findings indicate that this may now be achievable. “This is the first time anyone has made scalable amounts of epithelial stem cells that are capable of generating the epithelial component of hair follicles,” Dr. Xiaowei Xu, an associate professor of dermatology at Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, said in a university news release.

According to Xu, those cells have many potential applications that extend to wound healing, cosmetics and hair regeneration.

In their new study, Xu’s team converted induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) – reprogrammed adult stem cells with many of the characteristics of embryonic stem cells – into epithelial stem cells. This is the first time this has been done in either mice or people.

The epithelial stem cells were mixed with certain other cells and implanted into mice. They produced the outermost layers of the skin and hair follicles that are similar to human hair follicles. This study was published in the Jan. 28 edition of the journal Nature Communications.

This suggests that these cells might eventually help regenerate hair in people.

Xu said this achievement with iPSC-derived epithelial stem cells does not mean that a treatment for baldness is around the corner. Hair follicles contain both epithelial cells and a second type of adult cells called dermal papillae.

“When a person loses hair, they lose both types of cells,” Xu said. “We have solved one major problem — the epithelial component of the hair follicle. We need to figure out a way to also make new dermal papillae cells, and no one has figured that part out yet.”

Experts also note that studies conducted in animals often fail when tested in humans.

Vascular Progenitors Made from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Repair Blood Vessels in the Eye Regardless of the Site of Injection


Johns Hopkins University medical researchers have reported the derivation of human induced-pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that can repair damaged retinal vascular tissue in mice. These stem cells, which were derived from human umbilical cord-blood cells and reprogrammed into an embryonic-like state, were derived without the conventional use of viruses, which can damage genes and initiate cancers. This safer method of growing the cells has drawn increased support among scientists, they say, and paves the way for a stem cell bank of cord-blood derived iPSCs to advance regenerative medical research.

In a report published Jan. 20 in the journal Circulation, Johns Hopkins University stem cell biologist Elias Zambidis and his colleagues described laboratory experiments with these non-viral, human retinal iPSCs, that were created generated using the virus-free method Zambidis first reported in 2011.

“We began with stem cells taken from cord-blood, which have fewer acquired mutations and little, if any, epigenetic memory, which cells accumulate as time goes on,” says Zambidis, associate professor of oncology and pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Cell Engineering and the Kimmel Cancer Center. The scientists converted these cells to a status last experienced when they were part of six-day-old embryos.

Instead of using viruses to deliver a gene package to the cells to turn on processes that convert the cells back to stem cell states, Zambidis and his team used plasmids, which are rings of DNA that replicate briefly inside cells and then are degraded and disappear.

Next, the scientists identified and isolated high-quality, multipotent, vascular stem cells that resulted from the differentiation of these iPSC that can differentiate into the types of blood vessel-rich tissues that can repair retinas and other human tissues as well. They identified these cells by looking for cell surface proteins called CD31 and CD146. Zambidis says that they were able to create twice as many well-functioning vascular stem cells as compared with iPSCs made with other methods, and, “more importantly these cells engrafted and integrated into functioning blood vessels in damaged mouse retina.”

Working with Gerard Lutty, Ph.D., and his team at Johns Hopkins’ Wilmer Eye Institute, Zambidis’ team injected these newly iPSC-derived vascular progenitors into mice with damaged retinas (the light-sensitive part of the eyeball). The cells were injected into the eye, the sinus cavity near the eye or into a tail vein. When Zamdibis and his colleagues took images of the mouse retinas, they found that the iPSC-derived vascular progenitors, regardless of injection location, engrafted and repaired blood vessel structures in the retina.

“The blood vessels enlarged like a balloon in each of the locations where the iPSCs engrafted,” says Zambidis. Their vascular progenitors made from cord blood-derived iPSCs compared very well with the ability of vascular progenitors derived from fibroblast-derived iPSCs to repair retinal damage.

Zambidis says that he has plans to conduct additional experiments in diabetic rats, whose conditions more closely resemble human vascular damage to the retina than the mouse model used for the current study, he says.

With mounting requests from other laboratories, Zambidis says he frequently shares his cord blood-derived iPSC with other scientists. “The popular belief that iPSCs therapies need to be specific to individual patients may not be the case,” says Zambidis. He points to recent success of partially matched bone marrow transplants in humans, shown to be as effective as fully matched transplants.

“Support is growing for building a large bank of iPSCs that scientists around the world can access,” says Zambidis, although large resources and intense quality-control would be needed for such a feat. However, Japanese scientists led by stem-cell pioneer Shinya Yamanaka are doing exactly that, he says, creating a bank of stem cells derived from cord-blood samples from Japanese blood banks.

Synthetic Matrices that Induce Stem Cell-Mediated Bone Formation


Biomimetic matrices resemble living structures even though they are made from synthetic materials. Researchers in the laboratory of Shyni Varghese at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering have used calcium phosphate to direct mesenchymal stem cells to form bone. In doing so, Varghese and his colleagues have identified a surprising pathway from biomaterials to bone.

Varghese and his colleagues think that their work may point out new targets for treating bone defects, such as major fractures, and bone metabolic disorders such as osteoporosis.

The first goal of this research was to use materials to build something that looked like bone. This way, stem cells harvested from bone marrow (the squishy stuff inside our bones) could sense the presence of bone and differentiate into osteoblasts, the cells in our bodies that build bone.

“We knew for years that calcium phosphate-based materials promote osteogenic differentiation of stem cells, but none of use knew why.” said Varghese. “As engineers, we want to build something that is reproducible and consistent, so we need to know how building factors contribute to this end.”

Varghese and co-workers discovered that phosphate ions dissolved from calcium phosphate-based materials and these stray phosphate ions are taken up by the stem cells and used for the production of adenosine triphosphate or ATP. ATP is the energy currency of the cell, and it is the way cells store energy in a form that is readily usable for powering other reactions.

In stem cells, the generation of ATP eventually increases the intracellular concentration of the ATP breakdown product adenosine, and adenosine signals to stem cells to differentiate into osteoblasts and make bone.

Varghese said that she was surprised that “the biomaterials were connected to metabolic pathways. And we didn’t know how these metabolic pathways could influence stem cells,” and their commitment to bone formation.

These results also explain another clinical observation. Plastic surgeons have been using fat-based stem cells for eyelid lifts, breast augmentation, and other types of reconstructive surgeries. In once case, a plastic surgeon injected a dermal filler that contained calcium hydroxyapatite with the fat-based stem cells into a woman’s eyelid to provide an eye lift. However, the stem cells formed bone, and the poor lady’s lid painfully clicked every time she blinked and she had to have surgery to remove the ectopic bone. These results from Varghese’s laboratory explains why these fat-based stem cells formed bone in this case, and great care should be taken to never use such fillers in fat-based transplantation procedures.

Frozen Stem Cells Taken from a Cadaver Five Years Ago Vigorously Grow


It is incumbent upon regenerative medicine researchers to discover non-controversial sources of stem cells that are safe and abundant. To that end, harvesting stem cells from deceased donors might represent an innovative and potentially unlimited reservoir of different stem cells.

In this present study, tissues from the blood vessels of cadavers were used as a source of human cadaver mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hC-MSCs). The scientists in this paper successfully isolated cells from arteries after the death of the patient and subjected them to cryogenic storage in a tissue-banking facility for at least 5 years.

After thawing, the hC-MSCs were re-isolated with high-efficiency (12 × 10[6]) and showed all the usual characteristics of mesenchymal stromal cells. They expressed all the proper markers, were able to differentiate into the right cell types, and showed the same immunosuppressive activity as mesenchymal stromal cells from living persons.

Thus the efficient procurement of stem cells from cadavers demonstrates that such cells can survive harsh conditions, low oxygen tensions, and freezing and dehydration. This paves the way for a scientific revolution where cadaver stromal/stem cells could effectively treat patients who need cell therapies.

See Sabrina Valente, and others, Human cadaver multipotent stromal/stem cells isolated from arteries stored in liquid nitrogen for 5 years.  Stem Cell Research & Therapy 2014, 5:8.